Tessa Lark

Tessa Lark is one of the most captivating artistic voices of her time.

IMAGE CREDIT: KATE LEMMON

Tessa Lark is a Silver Medalist of the 9th Quadrennial International Violin Competition of Indianapolis, recipient of a 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant, and winner of the Naumburg International Violin Competition in 2012. She has been consistently praised by critics and audiences alike for her astounding range of sounds, technical agility, and musical elegance.

 

Tessa has appeared with orchestras throughout the U.S. since making her concerto debut with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra at age sixteen. As a recitalist and chamber musician she has performed at Carnegie’s Weill Hall in New York and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, and with the Perlman Music Program, San Francisco Performances, Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts, Ravinia’s Bennett-Gordon Classics series, the Troy Chromatics series, Chamber Music Tulsa, the Caramoor Wednesday Morning Concert series, Seattle Chamber Music Society, and the Marlboro, Yellow Barn, Olympic, and Music@Menlo festivals. Highlights of her 2016-17 season include a return to Weill Hall, where she premieres a new work by Michael Torke, and concerto engagements with the Alabama, Richardson, Valdosta and South Florida symphonies; the Evansville, Illinois, and Lexington philharmonics; the Mission (San Jose, Calif.) and Gettysburg chamber orchestras; and the Symphony of Westchester.

Keeping in touch with her Kentucky roots, Tessa enjoys playing bluegrass and Appalachian music and collaborates frequently with Mark O'Connor.

Tessa started playing violin at age six, and in2001 joined the Starling Strings Program at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, where she studied with Kurt Sassmannshaus. She entered New England Conservatory in the fall of 2006 to begin studies with Miriam Fried, and completed her Master’s degree in May 2012.

Tessa is currently participating in The Juilliard School’s prestigious Artist Diploma program under the guidance of Sylvia Rosenberg and Ida Kavafian. As part of her prize from winning the Indianapolis Competition, she plays the 1683 ex-Gingold Stradivari violin, on loan to her for four years.